Out of This World Tiered Necklace

Out of This World Tiered Necklace for Perles et Cetera Magazine
by Carmi Cimicata, John Bead Corp Marketing and Social Media Manager

Published Autumn Issue 2017 in French

 

I have been thinking a lot about our planet lately. Our connection to the sun and the other planets in our solar system are mysteries we have yet to truly unlock. With these thoughts in mind I attempted to create a necklace that would showcase our solar system in a necklace. I felt like I was back in high school as I tried to remember the order of our planets and what their most basic colours were.

The first step was to find beads that would resemble the planets. Happily, my company John Bead Corp has a rather large selection of semi-precious beads. Our solar system has eight “official” planets, which orbit the Sun. I reviewed the planet colours on “Ask an Astronomer” and selected the matching semi-precious beads that would work best on my necklace.  Amazonite beads are usually in a mixed color strand. You will find beads that are pale blue to brown with this gemstone. I also used yellow jade for my gold Saturn, red jasper for Mars, agate for orange and white Jupiter and some sodalite for Earth’s white and blue.

The planets, in order of their distance from the Sun, are Mercury (Gray), Venus (pale Yellow), Earth (blue and white), Mars (reddish brown), Jupiter (orange and white bands), Saturn (pale gold), Uranus (pale blue) and Neptune (pale blue).  This printed solar system became my template. I did not want too much empty space in the middle of my piece, so I went with five strands instead of eight.

I chose a pretty yellow jade pendant for my sun. I knew the first strand on this tiered necklace needed to be centered properly with a focal piece. I used a good beading wire to create all five unique tiers. Once the first tier was measured and the pendant was in place, I was able to set all the planets in locations similar to how they looked on my printed solar system map.

My rough measurements for strand lengths did not help. I quickly realized my strands were going to need tweaking and I had to “eyeball” each tier.

Since I needed to see where each “planet” would be set it was easier to set aside my ruler and use my own judgment for the right lengths. In order to ensure that each tier would hang properly I needed to cut slightly longer lengths of stringing wire so I could add or subtract wire depending on where my planets were. Taping my tiers was a very helpful part of the process.

When I figured out where a planet needed to be, I marked my wire, set a crimp in place and flattened it. Then I strung my bead and placed and flattened a second crimp to keep it secure on the wire. For tier two, I only had one bead to set.

I finished both ends of each wire with an Ez-Crimp. I taped each tier to my board to keep the strands sorted and the wire properly shaped.

I used jump rings to attach all my finished tiers to five-hole coupling bars. A lobster clasp and jump ring completed the necklace. It was fun and relaxing to get all the beads set. I started to get really good at flattening my crimp beads too!

I think my finished necklace does indeed resemble our solar system!

(P.S. I thought long and hard about adding Pluto, even though it isn’t considered a planet anymore. I might just attach a small dangling bead to represent it.)

Supplies Used
Semi Precious Yellow Jade Pendant
Semi Precious Round Beads for the eight planets
Gold Crimps
Beadalon EZ-Crimp Ends, Gold
Beading Wire – Softflex Medium Flex Wire
5 strand coupling bars
Small Jump rings
Lobster Clasp and Large Jump Ring

Tools Used
Japanese Style Side Cutter Pliers
Econo Flat Nose Pliers to open and close jump rings
Crimping Plier to attach Easy Crimps to wire
Needle nose plier to flatten crimps

Spelling Secrets with Semi Precious Stones


In the current issue of Perles et Cetera, a premier French publication for jewelry makers, we have a new semi precious project step by step.  This is the English translation.
Designed by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp. and Perles et Cetera.

Spelling a word by using gemstones is a style of jewelry called “acrostic.” Similar to acrostic poetry, when the first letter of each sentence creates a word, acrostic jewelry uses the first letter of a gemstone to also create a word. It creates a hidden meanings or messages in the design.

As an example, LOVE in an acrostic jewelry piece might be a Lapis bead next to Opal, next to Verdite next to an Emerald. In England, one of the most popular words to spell out was REGARD, which usually featured Rubies (2), Emerald, Garnet, Amethyst, and Diamond. They also used DEAREST or the name of a person in sentimental jewelry for engagement rings or anniversary gifts. Antique rings, bracelets, brooches and pins featuring unique gemstones may in fact be acrostic jewelry and you would have never known.

Napoleon Bonaparte designed the jewelry that ultimately exposed me to acrostic jewelry. He worked with a jeweller in Paris and always enjoyed marking special occasions with both large and small keepsakes. The Nitot jewellery house became the official jeweller of Napoleon in 1802. (They eventually were renamed the House of Chaumet.) The son of the founder, François Regnault created jewelry, crowns, sword hilts and more for Napoleon, both his wives and his court.

It is the gifts that he created for his second wife Marie Louise that caught my attention. He had the jeweller spell out his birthday, her birthday and their wedding anniversary in three beautiful bracelets. From the moment I saw these bracelets I was enchanted. I can’t think of a more romantic way to memorialize an important day. It becomes a secret between the gift giver and recipient and when worn, a constant reminder of their private celebrations.

Napoleon 15 Aôut 1769
Natrolite, Amethyst, Peridot, Opal, Lapis, Emerald, Onyx, Natrolite [15]
Agate, Opal, Uranite, Turquoise [1769].

Marie Louise 12 Decembre 1791
Malachite, Amethyst, Ruby, Iris, Emerald, Lapis, Opal, Uranite, Iolite, Sapphire, Emerald [12]
Diamond, Emerald, Chrysoprase, Emerald, Malachite, Beryl, Ruby, Emerald [1791].

27 Mars 1810, 2 Avril 1810
[27] Malachite, Amethyst, Ruby, Serpentine [1810], [2]
Amethyst, Vermeil, Ruby, Iris, Limestone [1810].

Creating an acrostic jewelry piece is a lot less expensive today than the pieces jewellers created in the 1800’s. Designers, jewellers and weekend hobbyists have access to many semi precious stones by simply visiting a local bead store or by placing an order online. Sometimes gemstones are even less expensive than glass or resin.  I work for one of the largest distributors of gemstone beads in Canada and we even have an Outlet attached to our warehouse that has many of these strands ready to purchase, at great prices.

For this project I decided to create a set of jewellery that features my own name. It will be a secret just between you and me. People will only notice the pretty gemstones and will never know that it carries significance. I have a plan to create sets of acrostic jewelry for friends and family using their names or special dates. I can’t wait to see the look of surprise when they read the notes I’ll include explaining why I used the gemstones I did for their gifts.

My project began with a review of the Crystal Bible by Judy Hall. I wanted to make a list of gemstones that had first letters linking to my own. The first letter of my name “C” was simple; Carnelian is a favourite. The last letter of my name “I” was a little harder. This letter is usually a descriptor for a gemstone such as Indian Topaz or Iris Opal. I then wrote my first alphabet gemstone-shopping list.

I settled on these strands after reviewing all the possibilities in our semi precious bead category at John Bead.

Carnelian for the C,

Amethyst for the A,

Rainbow Agate for the R,

Mookaite for the M and

Iron Zebra Jasper for I.

Once I knew which gemstones I wanted to use, I started to select the shapes. This took some thinking. Did I want big square beads, rectangles, rough cuts, round or chips? Sometimes having too many options makes designing very difficult. I settled on three shapes; ovals, rondelles and round. I knew that these would work well for a set of jewelry that also included earrings.

I also selected round wood beads for the body of the pieces. Wood is lightweight, fairly inexpensive and would allow me to just use a few semi precious beads per project. My stash of beads to match the alphabet will need to include one or two strands per letter of the alphabet. That means I have twenty-one more gemstones to select to complete my alphabet and the hunt is part of the fun for me!

Last but not least I gathered rhinestone rondelles. Who can resist a little extra sparkle? In the bracelets Napoleon designed, the diamonds and gold created the most beautiful frames. I wanted to bring some of that glamour to these simple stringing projects.

Once my gemstones were in the right order, spelling out CARMI, I made several sets for a necklace, bracelet and two earrings. I used various sizes of stones and spent some time deciding which colours worked best. All gemstones strands have various shades throughout, so I was able to select lighter Mookaite beads and even one that looked marbled. The necklace I strung with bead wire. The bracelet was made with elastic cord and the earrings feature the semi-precious beads stacked on a headpin and added to a pre made earing shape.

My jewelery set is unique, lightweight, sparkly and it was fairly inexpensive to make. Now I just need to decide which family member names I will work with next. Happily, that will mean more trips to the bead store for gemstones!

All products shown are from John Bead Corp.

Rococo Inspired Weaving and Braiding

1

Rococo Inspired Weaving and Braiding by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp and Perles et Cetera Fall 2016 Issue

When I think of rococo, the extravagant gowns and hairstyles of Marie Antoinette come to mind immediately. The Rococo style was coming to the end of its popularity at the same time support for the French monarchy died. Rococo styling had been featured in architecture, home décor and fashion, it was “just too much” and it was criticised for being superficial and ridiculous. In the end, I believe it showcased a style of living that few people could attain (we all know how it worked out for Marie Antoinette) and lead to a new movement, the Empire Style, that was simpler, free spirited and with less decoration.

1c 1b

Although Rococo appeared frivolous, it still included intricate patterns and designs. It also featured imagery of love and romance. With that style guide in mind, I decided to create some bracelets that would feature patterns derived by weaving and braiding with two classic royal colors: red and purple.

1d

Bracelet one is a woven pattern created on a new tool, the Beadalon Bracelet Weaver tool. Bracelet two is the same woven design, however it has been cut and embellished in an “over the top” manor. Bracelet three is a classic kumihimo 8-strand braid. Worn together they would be extravagant. However, in the words of Iris Apfel, “Most people say take one off: I say add one on.” This over-embellishment ideal is my own.

2

To create the weave for the bracelets I used the latest award-winning tool to be launched by Beadalon this year: the Bangle Bracelet Weaver. The metal base has three sets of holes, which ultimately creates three different sized bangles. I used the large size and set my warp pins into the outer circle of holes. The tool comes with wonderful step-by-step photo instructions and you can see a video demonstration on their YouTube channel explaining how to create fabulous wire and fiber bangles.

3

The first bracelet began with just a simple knot to tie my two rattail strands together and then I weaved.

4

It is a positively enjoyable process because you start to see your patterns quickly.

5

To make your weaving permanent, a length of fiber or wire is used to thread between your woven fibers next to the warp pins.

6

My finished bangle is lightweight since I used rattail and some cording to make it.

I then made a second identical bangle.

7

I needed to cut my second bangle open, so to ensure my weaving would not unravel I added lines of glue in two locations.

8

When the glue was completely dry I simply cut next to the glue lines.

9

I then attached my silver end caps with additional glue hiding those two unfinished cut sections.

10

With my bangle now flat, I was able to hand stitch some beads throughout. My open bangle was finished with a magnetic clasp and I chose to dangle to crystal heart pendants to the clasp with jump rings.

11

The third bracelet was created with my kumihimo disk and finishing components.

Together I have a set of bracelets, which can be worn on one or both arms. The addition of some beautiful Swarovski crystal hearts adds the romance factor I was seeking. Slider bails allowed me to attach a Swarovski heart pendant to the kumihimo bracelet and I experimented with both 3 and 5 bails. In the end I used one bail and attached my two other crystal hearts to the beaded bangle.

fb

This project appeared originally in French in the Fall 2016 issues of Perles et Cetera magazine.  They did a wonderful job photographing and showcasing the bracelets!

John Bead Corp Products Used

Bracelet One
Bangle Bracelet Weaver Tool
Red and Purple Rattail
Red Lovely Knots Cord

Bracelet Two
Bangle Bracelet Weaver Tool
Red and Purple Rattail
Red Lovely Knots Cord
Rectangle Kumihimo End Caps
Magnetic Closure
Jump Rings
Swarovski Pendant 6202 Heart
Miyuki 11.0 Seed Beads
Preciosa Red Ripple™ Beads

Bracelet Three
Dazzle-it Kumihimo Disk
Red and Purple rattail
End Cap and Closure set for Kumihimo
Pendant Bail Slider
Swarovski Pendant 6202 Heart
Jump Rings

Creativity on The Catwalk Show – Madagascar Look

madagascar model-3

Our Global Chic product line was beautifully captured in this picture from the “Creativity on the Catwalk” fashion shows in the UK last month at CHSI Stitches.

The model is Adrienne Hayley Dayes.   (Photo from CHSI)

Our Creative Director, Fernando DaSilva designed an “out of the ordinary collection of jewelry that is delightfully different, chic and of course trendsetting.”

One of the looks he styled features a spectacular necklace which also appear in the latest Perles et Cetera magazine as a step by step.   The english translation is provided in this post.

PicMonkey Collage2

Madagascar Necklace Designed by Fernando DaSilva, Creative Director, John Bead Corp

In 2015, PRECIOSA ORNELA introduced a new pressed bead known as the PRECIOSA Ripple™. The circular bead has a centrally located hole and the undulating surface of the bead causes a ripple to pass through the metallic decoration in both the shiny and matt finish.

Designers around the world are combining the Ripple™ with other beads and discovering that it can also be strung and showcased in a number of unique ways.

Fernando chose to recreate the look of an African necklace usually made with horn discs. These African bead necklaces are called Laguidibá and are usually in black or brown. Fernando created his own version of this distinct style by stacking Ripple™  beads colours in blocks.

Madagascar Necklace

“I wanted to design a necklace that would be an homage to the hardworking African woman. She’s wearing beautiful fabrics and jewels. She is positive and the heart of the family. Beauty is a daily routine. I wanted to express this attitude with glass beads.”

Recreating this tiered necklace and customizing it to your own colour pallet is not difficult if you follow a few simple jewelry-making steps.

Madagascar-Step-1

  1. Select your Ripple™ beads and divide your strands into small piles of sixteen beads.

Madagascar-Step-2

  1. String three different strands:

Strand one features seven colour sets. (7 x16)

Strand two has six colour sets (6X16)

Strand three has five colour sets (5X16)

Madagascar-Step-3

  1. A unique Global Chic teardrop bead was added to both ends of the strands before finishing with a wire guardian and crimp bead. Fernando used two crimp beads to ensure his beads were securely strung.

Madagascar-Step-4

  1. The three strands were then attached with a jump ring to the dream catcher connector. The placement of the strands is important to ensure you have the tiered effect. Also, he thought the dream catcher component would be perfect for matching earrings.

Madagascar-Step-5

  1. A clasp is your last step. If you would like to wear the necklace slightly longer or simply make it fit better, a necklace extender will finish the necklace so that anyone can wear it.

Madagascar-Bracelet-1

Ripple™ beads also work beautifully on elastic cording. Leftover beads can be easily sorted for matching bracelets. The ethnic chic look can be achieved with the addition of matched and stacked bracelets.

madagascar-2

The bracelets and the necklace are completely on trend this summer.

FD-Global Chic-7

The earrings for this look are also showstoppers.  Fernando continued “I really wanted big earrings so I created a vintage inspired chandelier earring set with semi precious drops and beads.  The beads have been added to filigree earrings hand set with more ripple beads.

Signature Products Used From John Bead Corp

27800957-17s5       Turquoise Alabaster Preciosa Ripple Beads

27800957-04s5       Copper Preciosa Ripple Beads

27800957-65s8       Silk Matt Yellow Czech Preciosa Ripple Beads

27800957-75s8       Silk Matt Periwinkle Czech Preciosa Ripple Beads

27800957-18s5       Opaque Medium Red Czech Preciosa Ripple Beads

27800957-19s5       Black Opaque Czech Preciosa Ripple Beads

32630137                 Dream catcher Pendant/Connector

27600215-00          Abstract Black/White Global Chic Tear Drops

25000666                 Beadalon Wire .018/49Strand

24002013                 4mm Bead Crimp Cover Stardust

24001016                 Wire Guardian

22801027                 7mm Jump Ring

23440047                 26mm Lobster Clasp

This final post is number six in our series from the Creativity on The Catwalk show

Look One – Golden Butterscotch can be viewed here.

Look Two – Wild Boho can be reviewed here.

Look Three – The Global Jet-Setter

Look Four – The Nomadic Travellor

Look Five – Let It Swing Look

Vintage 50’s Necklace With A Kumihimo Twist

 

1a

Designed by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp and Perles et Cetera Winter 2016 Issue. This is the English translation of the step by step that appeared in French in the current issue of the Magazine.

Kumihimo Kumihimo

This simple kumihimo disk has become the most loved tool in my studio. Made of foam, it is surprisingly sturdy. Kumihimo is an ancient braiding technique. Today, the classic 8-strand braid is easy to create with a variety of stringing materials. Most kumihimo disks come with instructions for this braid. Rattail is usually included because it the most common string used by kumihimo designers. It braids easily and is available in a wide selection of colours and several thicknesses.

4

I love the 8-strand braid and have tested it with virtually every stringing material I have in my stash.   Thick and thin lengths of cording combine to create the most elegant braids. They look complicated and unique. This really appeals to me as a designer.

5

To create the three tiered necklace I set up three completely different braids. My disk looked different each time. For one braid I used Neo Chain and classic kumihimo polyester rattail.

6

My second braid features several different thicknesses of cotton wax cord.

7

The third braid is especially unique with one extra thick piece of Nappa leather cord, soutache cord, cotton wax cord and rattail.

8

The color palette for these braids was influenced by the announcement of the 2016 Pantone Color of the year. This is the first time they have selected two colours; Rose Quartz and Serenity.

Pantone_Color_of_the_Year_2016_shop_Pantone_Swatch_Cards

2016 Pantone Color(s) of the Year.

Kumihimo

I glued my three braids into a special large kumihimo end cap. I made sure to let this cure overnight before adding my lobster clasp in order to ensure that the three braids were permanently in place.

10

I think the necklace looks lovely on it’s own. The chain I added to one of the braids adds a tiny bit of glitter.

11

However, what is life without a little extra embellishment? As a jewelry lover I also have quite a few of these vintage brooches in my collection.

12

I added this over the top rhinestone brooch and felt quite satisfied with the final necklace. The brooch is in place with just its pin back, so it is easy to remove, replace or switch out for a different color.

perles2

Here is how the necklace appears in the current issue of Perles Et Cetera.

Products Used from John Bead Corp.

Kumihimo Circle Disk

Dazzle-it Rattail

Dazzle-it Cotton Wax Cord

Metal Complex Napa Leather

Kumihimo End Cap #23820105-01

Lobster Claw

Quick Grip Glue

More Information

If you go to blog.dazzle-it.com you will see over sixty posts I have written featuring kumihimo.

If you would like to see a video demonstrating the classic 8-strand technique go to this link.

Global Chic Glamour Necklace for Perles et Cetera

Global Chic by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead

Global Chic Glamour Necklace by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp

The desire to explore distant lands and to experience cultural diversity is the inspiration for the new DIY jewelry making line from John Bead called Global Chic.

This twisted and curved necklace was inspired by several of the unique items in the collection. The necklace features; tapestry cord, channel beads, geometric chain and an unusual clasp feature.

12294744_964776933581879_8170134972590610388_n cover

The step by step instructions appeared in french in the current issue of Perles et cetera. This is the english translation.

Global Chic Tapestry Cord

The necklace is possible due to the new Tapestry Cord in our Global Chic collection. Colorful woven cotton threads wrapped around a cotton core are the main highlight of the Global Chic collection. It is incredibly flexible and can manipulated into many pleasing shapes.

3

Channel beads are ideal for the savvy jewelry maker who wants to make one-of-kind components. These metallic beads are used as charms to create an extra design element to your tapestry cord designs. The holes are extra large to allow tapestry cord to pass through. The collection contains a nice assortment of sizes so you can work with a big or small channel bead.

4

The open channel area around the beads can be embellished with seed beads and all types of stringing material such as: hemp, leather, faux suede, rattail or threads. For my project I strung seed beads on elastic and then placed them on the channel bead. A little glue was applied to ensure these would stay in place.

5

I also applied some rhinestone chain to my larger channel beads with glue. I always like to add a little sparkle to anything I create.

6

Creating the necklace was very simple. I started by placing two channel beads on the cord (as shown in the picture) so that I was working in the middle of my tapestry cord.

7

Then I continued to twist my cord into pleasing shapes using my channel beads to hold the cord in place. Pins were also very helpful to create curves that were equal on both sides.

8

I reinforced these curves with a few extra stitches. It is very easy to sew through the tapestry cord. Several more curves later I choose to stop so that my necklace would be slightly longer than a traditional collar piece.

9

I added my unique clasp when the length was correct. These button shapes also work well with the sliders in the Global Chic collection. I glued the cord into the clasp on one side.

10

On the other side, I folded my cord and used a slider to hold the shape. Glue was strategically placed to keep the slider in place and the one exposed tapestry cord end from unraveling.

 11a

The next part was super easy because Global Chic already has unique geometric chain to choose from.   The chains are made of acrylic, which allows for a bold and extravagant design, but it is also lightweight. I divided this piece into two.

11

A few jump rings attached to my tapestry cord created my frame of brushed silver and metal. I had to make sure the chain would not interfere with the clasp, so on one side I sewed the jump ring in place.

12

I also added an extra jump ring at the halfway point so it would keep the chain and cord together throughout.

13

My last step was to sew some of the Global Chic multicolored beads to my necklace. These beads resemble abstract art works. They are made of genuine reconstructed stones.

14

My finished piece, when worn, has a 3D effect. The cord is slightly higher than the chain and one cannot help but reach out to touch it to see what it is made from. I do hope you love it as much as I do.  Thank you Perles et Cetera for presenting this necklace so beautifully.

John Bead Products Used

Global Chic Tapestry Cord

Global Chic Geometric Chain

Global Chic Channel Beads

Global Chic Clasp

Global Chic Gemstone Beads

Extras

Jump rings, seed beads and rhinestone chain

Tools

Glue, needle and thread, pliers

Tropical Punch Necklace Featured In Perles Et Cetera Magazine

This is the necklace featured in the Spring 2015 Perles Et Cetera magazine.  Designed by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead Corp and Dazzle-it.

They did a beautiful job showcasing the design and the step by step flower brooch project. The magazine is published in French, so this is the English translation of the article and how-to.

As the Social Media and Marketing Manager for John Bead I am in the enviable position of seeing products that will be released to our customers six months to a year in advance.  It is so difficult to keep many of these product launches a secret!

John Bead invites you to take an imaginary trip to a faraway land that has been in the American spotlight for almost two decades. We are excited to introduce our new program inspired by the colors and flavors of Brazil under our house brand Dazzle-it™ – Make it shine.  Our new collection is called “Tropical Punch.”  For almost two decades Brazil has captured the interest of international investors and has been in the media as one of the most unique and effervescent melting pots in the world.   

Our Tropical Punch product line translates the trendy colors of Brazil, the sensuous style of Brazilian women and the joyful vibe of the country.  Included in the bigger collection are several unique components that I used to make this tropical flower necklace.

Tropical Punch features opaque round and teardrop shaped beads in many colours.  Once combined, they can create exotic and spiky flowers when sewn through a multi-hole metal component.  This component, also known as a perforated disk has an easy-to-attach backing pin that makes your completed projects look professionally finished.  I will show you how easy it is to make retro flower brooches, which you can wear as is or attach to a necklace as I did for my finished sample.

I have always wanted to know how retro 50’s flower brooches were created.  I discovered that some simple sewing into the disk will result in some gorgeous beaded blooms.  (I start with a needle that has a double length of thread about 24 inches long with a knot at the end.)

My first group of beads I sew side by side (leaving no openings) around and into the edge of the disk.  It will feel like they are too loose and floppy at this point.  Do not worry; we are about to fix that in the next step.

When the first row is in place, I then take my needle and thread up through the disk and only sew through the beads themselves.  I pull my thread as I go and you will see your petals are better positioned.

This extra step tightens the petals beautifully and you can see a true flower shape now.  With my needle still threaded I sew back down into the disk.

Adding in the second row of petals requires a little bit of patience and careful observation.  The holes in the disk are your guide.  You can add as many petals as will fit snuggly in the opening.  I continue sewing through the disk with my original threaded needle.  (If you have to add more thread, just make sure to knot your thread end and use a tiny bead as a stopper on the back side.)

One large bead can be used as the flower center.  I sewed this bead twice to the disk to ensure it was firmly in place.  This bead also helps to retain the flower shape of the second row of petals.

The back of my disk looks quite neat.  I used a tiny bead as a bead stop and knotted my thread when I was finished.

Once you get the hang of the original flower shape you can begin to experiment adding in extra flowers and beads as I did.  As long as you can run your thread through the, disk the extra embellishments will stay in place.  I make sure that you do not see any part of the metal disk with extra beading.

When you have finished your sewing, the disk pin back easily fits into place and you can use a plier to press the tabs down so the back is then attached to the front disk.  It looks beautiful now!

We also have a collection of polyester pipe which is a colorful, flexible and versatile hollow plastic pipe covered with polyester thread.  This material offers unique functionality and is a great product to be incorporated into many multi-media applications.  You can see how I cut two pieces of the pipe and positioned them side by side before gluing on two end caps.

 

I can’t imagine a faster way to create a unique necklace to showcase my tropical flower brooches.  I just pined my flowers to the double pipe.

Since my project was completed so quickly I took a moment to see if there was any further embellishing I could do.  Happily, Dazzle-it also has a collection of Faux Suede Tassels.  A jump ring was all I needed to complete this look.  Matching earrings were made in moments with just a bead and tassel.

I hope our Tropical Punch collection encourages you to “turn your life into an endless summer.”  You’ll find more ideas on our blog and Facebook pages.

Products Used

Dazzle-it™ – Make it shine Tropical Punch beads, disks, end caps and polyester pipe

Dazzle-it™ – Make it shine Faux Suede Tassels

Dazzle-it™ – Make it shine Beading Needles and Threader