Skulls and Crosses

Skulls and crosses are featured on clothing and jewelry all year round.  They are recognizable symbols associated with many different types of groups.

For this necklace designed by Dana Bickram, she featured two unique items from our catalog.

This antique silver cross has some beautiful detailing.  Note, the reverse side is available for additional embellishment.

These glass skulls are fantastic and were lost in our catalog until we located them again in our warehouse.  Czech black glass pearls complete this piece. You could also use a semi precious lava stone as a black bead.

If you want to think about other ways to use the cross, this sample for the I Love Resin blog shows you one simple but spectacular way to feature glitter and resin.

KLIK and Stampendous Blog Hop Projects

Lea Kimmel – KLIK It, KLIK it Good!

Pam Hornschu – Jewelry In A Snap

Pam Hornschu – Klik Klik Klik – BOOOOO!

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Mona Lisa In Clay with Stampendous and Klik by Carmi Cimicata

 

Amy Hurley-Purdie – Klik Blog Hop Bracelet

Silhouette KLIK Necklace With Stampendous Glitters by Carmi Cimicata for Metal Complex

Klik and Stampendous Mica Fragment Bezels by Carmi Cimicata for Metal Complex

Jamie Martin Flower Bracelet Project

Jamie Martin – Butterfly Bracelet Theme

Janelle Stollfus – KLIK Bezel Blank Necklace

Tenia Nelson – Klik Necklace

Tenia Nelson – Klik Bracelet

We would like to extend our thank yous to all the bloggers who participated in this blog hop.  You have given everyone lots of inspiration for our KLIK components.

Elizabethan Inspired Pearl Tiered Necklace

The “Elizabethan Inspired Pearl Tiered Necklace” is featured in the winter issue of Perles et Cetera magazine as a four page step by step project.  This is the english translation.

Elizabethan Inspired Pearl Tiered Necklace by Carmi Cimicata for John Bead

If you have ever studied more than one painting of the Elizabeth the 1st, you would have to take note of the many pearls that she wore throughout her hair, clothing and on her personal items.  She literally had hundreds of pearls on her person.  She was a Queen known for her love of clothing and it is documented that she had over 2000 gowns created.

Pearls were widely available in Elizabethan times and I am certain Queen Elizabeth kept the pearl collecting and stringing industries busy.  If a queen wears pearls, so will all the members of her court along with anyone wanting to appear well dressed in her company.

Elizabeth’s designers would have used real pearls.  Seeing so many draped in row upon row of strands reminds me that many of the current statement necklaces have been inspired by jewelry designs over 200 years old.  Imagine if Elizabeth would have had access to the new glass and coloured pearls?  Would she have incorporated the neons, pastels or other colour palettes into her clothing?  I believe she would have.  She had many unusual and one of a kind dresses made.  These would have been assembled and worn for one-time only special events.  Surely a bright yellow pearl necklace would have been desired?

I decided to create a necklace for her featuring Dazzle-it Vintage Pink glass pearls.   Glass being much more affordable, I knew I could design a necklace with many draped strands without fear of going over budget.  I also created my own resin filled bezel pendant featuring Elizabeth the 1st as a focal point for my necklace.

My necklace features pearls, rhinestone beads and a resin filled bezel I designed featuring a portrait to Queen Elizabeth 1st.

 

A google search of Queen Elizabeth shows us many paintings and portraits along with some portraits of her mother Anne Boleyn.  This painting enlarged here is a favorite and features so many pearls.

I printed and cut out a copy of the painting and placed it into my bezel.  I covered the image with resin.

When my bezel was ready I gathered all my supplies for this project.  The vintage pink pearls look so wonderful gathered in a group.  I worked with three sizes of pearls along with three sizes of rhinestone beads.

The back of my Instant Glam bezel has two attachments.  I strung my pearls through these opening.

It took some time to string all my different strands.  I used a beading board to help me choose where to place the rhinestone beads.

With five strands to link, I was careful to use a thicker jump ring to attach my pearls to my clasps.

This is a simple stringing project, but the pearls and beads create a stunning result.  I am quite certain I will feel like royalty when I wear my necklace!

 

Dazzle-it Feathers and Chain

Pantone declared GREEN the colour for 2013, so I started reviewing my jewelry making stash to see what I already had.  The result is this feather, kumihimo, fabric and chain necklace.

One of the feathers I covered in  jewelry resin.  This makes my feather very permanent.  I really like the glassy surface.

I thought about just using the one feather for my necklace.

In the end though, I continued to add more feathers since they were already in my package.

These feathers are considered hat trims.  With the addition of a crimp end they dangle quite nicely!

This is new gunmetal chain in the Dazzle-it family!

The Beauty of Resin and Metal

I am quite certain that this pendant would stop anyone in their tracks.  It is truly beautiful and hand crafted by Nancy Donaldson.

Nancy was kind enough to show us what she used to make her pendants:  Jewelry Resin, Metal Complex Bezels and Dazzle-It Aluminum Wire.  Her own photography makes each pendant a work of art.

Thank you for sharing these images Nancy!

Sea Shell and Jewelry Resin

This Metal Complex bezel looks spectacular!  It looks like I spent a long time creating it.

This may be the simplest resin project ever!  John Bead sells these very special sheets of Decorative Sea Shell.  This natural ocean shell laminate is acid free and peel and stick!  All I did was cut a piece to fit my bezel and then I covered it with Jewelry Resin.

John Bead has Jewelry Resin in stock.  Jewelry Resin was created for the jewelry making industry.

Professional results are easy to achieve with EnviroTex® Jewelry Resin!  This product adds depth and crystal clear clarity like no other.  It visually enhances the surface on which it is applied, resulting in brighter, deeper and more intense colors.
EnviroTex® Jewelry Resin has amazing bubble release.
It is easy and fun to use and has a pleasing citrus scent!
(just during the mixing stage)
Formulated for high resistance to light exposure and UV rays from the sun.
When cured, the resin coating is extremely durable, waterproof, heat & chemical resistant.  EnviroTex® Jewelry Resin cures to a soft cure in 12 hours, medium cure in 24 hours and hard cure in 48 hours.

Crystal Clear
Heirloom Quality
Professional Jeweler’s Grade
Enough product to fill 20 large deep bezels
One thick coat equals 50 coats of varnish!

Resin Crafts blog has daily posts giving you ideas and tips to use this amazing resin.

The One-Upped Bezel with Jewelry Resin

Last month I showed you what my friend Nancy did with a metal complex bezel I gave her.  She sure made that bezel look spectacular with her wire twisting skills! It challenged me to create a finished piece that was equally as beautiful.

Jewelry Resin is available at John Bead.  We had a class featuring it in February and I am always excited to show jewelers how amazing this new resin is.

The bezel I started with was wrapped with Dazzle-It copper aluminum wire.  This kept it very light.  I choose one of Nancy’s photographs to work with.

Before you pour resin over paper you need to seal it with several layers of a gel medium or mod-podge.  You can learn all about these techniques on Resin Crafts Blog.

Once my paper was sealed I selected some dried leaves.

I also added a few scraps of copper wire to accentuate the tree branches.

Of course, I had to add in some beads…this was after all a sample for John Bead!  Glass seed beads are the ideal inclusion for resin work.

I did two pours of resin.  The first pour was to the halfway point in the bezel.  This allowed me to make sure all was perfect.  A day later I did the final pour to the bezel edge.  I let my piece cure for a full 48 hours after my final pour.  This bezel may be my best.  Now I just need to craft a super kumihimo cord to string it!

Metal Complex Blanks, Jewelry Resin and Kumihimo!

This necklace features a pendant made by John Bead’s very own Daniel John.

While on a recent trip to a UK craft show, Daniel had an opportunity to walk the show and in one booth he did an experiment with embossing powders on a Metal Complex leaf blank.  We both thought it turned out really well.  However, embossing powders would not last very long on a necklace if it came into contact with other embellishments.

To keep the design on the blank permanently I glazed the surface with Jewelry Resin.  One application of Jewelry resin is like 50 coats of varnish.  This design is permanent now!

I am returning the pendant to Daniel today.  I can’t return it on it’s own though.  It needs to be on a necklace.  Naturally, a kumihimo necklace is my first choice!  I used gold and black rattail on the circle disk.

The new kumihimo findings make finishing this necklace so easy!