Wire Frames – Tips On Using Wire Frames for the First Time

Tips On Using Wire Frames for the First Time

 

There are 8 shapes in our new Wire Frames collection.

The snowflake wire frame has been a staple in the craft world for over ten years.  We launched our small, medium and large snowflakes in 2012.  Since that time, there have been thousands of snowflakes made and we feature them annually as a wonderful holiday craft.

What makes wire frames such a great craft is that you don’t need many tools (a plier to make loops) and you can use virtually every bead in your stash to make a gorgeous ornament, suncatcher or display piece.

It is a beginner level craft, and while the frames were not designed for children’s crafting, allowing young people to select and load beads onto the frames is an easily supervised craft.  The adult in the room can then use the pliers to close up the prongs. The stainless steel wire is very hard, so you need good hand eye coordination to finish your ornament.

You will discover that they more time you spend adding and removing beads to form patterns, color palettes or design elements, the more projects you will want to try out later.  You can design right on the frames, or lay them down on a mat or a piece of felt and arrange the beads off the wire.

Your wire frames can feature cheap and cheerful beads or high end crystals.

You can turn a sentimental piece of broken jewelry into an ornament by adding the beads to a project.

We’ve seen vintage pearl necklaces re purposed into snowflake ornaments.

You can color match teams, school colors and company logos.

If you are a skilled crafter, you will realize that adding additional wires, fibers and more can turn these simple frames into works of art.

Minimalists and maximalists can work side by side creating.  Each finished piece a wonderful one of a kind piece.

The Sun Wire Frame is a perfect example of what you can do simply, and what you can do if you have some extra skills like Lena Gillespie.

Option One – Simply add beads to the prongs.

Option Two – Lena Gillespie added many more beads with extra wire working.